Mentoring for your college auditions | The MT Project

There’s just something about being on stage that I can’t really describe. It’s almost like being transported to this magical place where nothing else in the whole world matters. You know when you see something or hear something, and it just feels like perfection? It’s like that.

All I know is that I want to do this for the rest of my life.

There’s just something about being on stage that I can’t really describe. It’s almost like being transported to this magical place where nothing else in the whole world matters. You know when you see something or hear something, and it just feels like perfection? It’s like that.

All I know is that I want to do this for the rest of my life.

There’s just something about being on stage that I can’t really describe. It’s almost like being transported to this magical place where nothing else in the whole world matters. You know when you see something or hear something, and it just feels like perfection? It’s like that.

All I know is that I want to do this for the rest of my life.

Whatever your goal may be, it’s our mission to ensure that you achieve it.

And with us, advice is always free.

How to format your resume

A note on your training and experience…

See where I said “don’t exaggerate!” under the training section? That is really important. For example: if you’ve been in choir all 4 years of high school, don’t list your choir teacher’s name and say you’ve had 4 years of vocal training. (Unless you’ve gone to her office hours once per week for individual help the whole time, they’re simply not the same thing.) I’d also recommend against listing that you’ve had 2 years of ballet if you took it in the 1st and 2nd grades (unless you’ve actually kept practising). Why? Schools recognise potential. Your auditors will look far more kindly on the student with zero training but has raw talent and is coachable than they will on a student that lists they’ve had a considerable amount of training (OR experience — don’t inflate your theatrical experience) but falls flat. They usually can tell the difference, and it will make the question that student’s honesty and integrity. Don’t be that person.

What do I need for my headshot?

Format & Size

Your headshot can be horizontal (10″ wide by 8″ tall) or vertical (8″ wide by 10″ tall). The important part is that it IS 8×10 (note that is NOT 8.5×11, or the size of a standard piece of paper — see the note below about your resume and headshot together). Colour is also preferred, but if, for whatever reason, you feel your photo looks amazing in black and white, then that’s your call. If you cannot afford to print in colour or the 8×10, most colleges are understanding that high school students are not professionals, and your headshot will not make or break you. It is, however, in good form to understand the industry standard, and should take very little effort to comply.

Some headshots get printed with your name right over the photo and printing the photo ‘full bleed,’ which means there is no white trim. (If you do this, make sure your name is completely legible.) Most headshots have a 1/2″ to 1″ border around the top and sides, and a good chunk of white space at the bottom where your name gets printed. Keep the font clean and simple- no handwritten fonts, scripts, or fancy, hard-to-read text.

The look

In general, you want something that is going to be a shot of your full face down to about your shoulders. Please don’t use something that’s full body or awkwardly close-up on your face. It should also capture your personality, or even better, your type! The best headshots, whether they’re taken professionally or not, are interesting to look at. They make a statement. If you’re the class clown, tell your photographer a joke, be silly, laugh…and let him/her capture that. If you’re the seductive bad boy/girl, think of a secret or something sneaky.

Overall, you want your headshot show the best version of yourself. You want to leave the room and have your auditors remember you, right? Give them a photo that, when they look at it, helps them to remember you and how great you were!

Hiring a Professional...

…is not necessary. Having a professional headshot is an investment, and if you have one taken, you will get use of it throughout college. (Once you graduate / before you showcase, you’ll want to have professional headshots taken, regardless.) If you can afford to have them done, by all means, it is worth it. But if you can’t, it’s not that big of a deal. Perhaps you have a senior picture that would work; perhaps you have a friend or family member who is an amateur photographer that could help you out. Whatever you do, don’t use a glamour shot type photo or go to a portrait studio in the mall.

Another note about professional photos is that, if you use a photographer, you need their permission to reproduce it. If you use one of your senior photos, you might need to order 8x10s directly from them, which is costly. Headshot photographers may be more money, but they typically give you your photos on a disc, and you can take them to your local Target or drugstore and have them reprinted for $1.

What to wear

I encourage wearing a solid colour, just like you would at an audition. I find shots with the subject wearing black or white to be uninteresting. Pick a colour that is flattering on you, but is also reflective of your personality/type. Girls, don’t wear something that’s going to show an uncomfortable amount of cleavage, even if you are the seductress type.

Girls, lets talk about your makeup and hair. It doesn’t need to be extravagant (certainly not professionally done). I would encourage you to be as natural as you possibly can be. If you usually wear heavy, wing-tipped eyeliner, consider if that’s going to read well for your headshot. Keep it simple and let your natural beauty shine through- that will be the most effective!

The most important thing I could tell you here overall is that your photo needs to look like you. Your auditors need to recognise you from your photo when you walk in. If you’re a blonde in your photo, don’t dye your hair dark before your audition.

Putting your headshot & resume together

Note that your headshot should be 8×10 (or 10×8). This means that when you print your resume on a standard piece of paper, which is 8.5×11, it will be larger. You need to trim your resume down (which may mean reformatting just a bit to make sure you’re not trimming off text) so that they fit proportionately over one another. Once that’s done, put them back to back and staple the corners together. Alternately, if your headshot is printed on paper with a plain white back, you can print your resume directly on the back!

Again, this is one of those things that is in good form and shows professionalism, but it will not make or break your college audition. (In the professional world, yeah…your resume may get thrown right into the trash if it isn’t done this way.) If you don’t have the resources to pull this off, don’t sweat it, but it is sincerely worth the effort (or the effort of asking around for help) to get it done this way.

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Drop us an email | adriane@themtproject.org

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